NORI@MAD

Mid-Century Flower Containers – Black |  Mid-Century Flower Containers – White  |  Traditional Copper Flower Containers  |  Rikka

Flower Craft at the Museum of Arts and Design

Featured Artist: Noritaka Noda > May 24-29  /  10:00am-6:00pm

Museum of Art and Designexhibition details
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019  – location/map

Flower Craft celebrates the creative visions of botanical artists working at the forefront of contemporary floral design. Inspired by nature’s ephemerality and its inimitable palettes, these artists are investigating all stages of the plant life cycle, from seed to germination to decay, to interpret nature in sculptural form.As they expand the boundaries of materials and creative expression, the artists are also engaging in a variety of aesthetic traditions, from early modern European still life painting to the eighteenth-century picturesque to the hyperreality of the twenty-first-century digital realm—all of which will be explored in the exhibition. Each week, a celebrated botanical artist will fill the Flower Craft gallery with evocative arrangements or installations.

 

Flower Craft Atelier ~ Tue, May 24 / 6–8 pm

Flower Craft designer Noritaka Noda brings the Japanese school of Ikenobo to MAD’s Flower Craft Atelier. Enjoy light libations in the bloom-filled Flower Craft gallery with Noritaka and fellow flower lovers followed by a 90-minute workshop immersion in ikenobo ikebana, an ancient artistic tradition that Noritaka has famously modernized.

  • Explore the expressivity of ikebana and its interpretation in contemporary floral design.
  • Learn how to construct and secure an Ikebana arrangement inspired by the art form’s emphasis on impermanence, harmony, shape, and line.
  • Create an elegant ikebana arrangement for the home of your own design.

6 pm light libations
7:30–8 pm workshop – to learn more about Atelier, visit the MAD site

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NORI@MAD > Mid-Century Flower Containers – private collection

Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container

   

 

NORI@MAD > Mid-Century Flower Containers – private collection

 

Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container
Mid-century flower container Mid-century flower container

   

 

NORI@MAD > Traditional Copper Flower Containers – private collection

Ikenobo copper flower container
Ikenobo copper flower container Copper flower container
Ikenobo copper flower container
Ikenobo copper flower container Ikenobo copper flower container
Ikenobo copper flower container Ikenobo copper flower container
Ikenobo copper flower container
Ikenobo copper flower container Ikenobo copper flower container

Ikenobo copper flower container

Ikenobo copper flower container

  

 

NORI@MAD > Rikka

Ikenobo

The history of Ikenobo is the history of ikebana. Ikebana began with Ikenobo and although over 550 years many other schools have branched off from Ikenobo, Ikenobo is said to be the origin of ikebana. Ikenobo’s history encompasses both the traditional and the modern, the two continually interacting to encourage new development in today’s ikebana.

People in every era have loved flowers, but our predecessors in ikebana felt that flowers were not only beautiful but that they could reflect the passing of time and the feelings in their own hearts. When we sense plant’s unspoken words and silent movements we intensify our impressions through form, a form which becomes ikebana.

Rikka

Established in the Muromachi period, rikka is the oldest style of ikebana. By using various branches and plants rikka suggests the beauty of a whole natural landscape. In rikka trees symbolize mountains, while grasses and flowers suggest water. A natural landscape is expressed in a single vase. Indeed, all things in nature are reflected. In rikka it is important through the harmony of trees and plants to come to know the laws of nature.

Blooming flowers and lush greenery in all four seasons do not exist in isolation. Flowers bloom at appropriate times and trees and grasses put down roots where they are supposed to only when soil, sunlight, and water are available. It can be said that the beautiful natural landscapes we see are the result of the harmony of all things.

Rikka Shofutai
Established in the Muromachi period, rikka developed with the times in ways such as growing in size and becoming more complex. Rikka shofutai is a style formalized as standard during the Meiji Period.

Characteristics of Rikka Shofutai
With Ikenobo’s traditional sense of beauty, rikka shofutai is composed primarily of seven or nine yakueda (main parts) reflecting the inner character of each plant. With complex and varied composition the natural beauty and dignity of plants are expressed.

 

To learn more about Ikenobo and Rikka, please visit the IKENOBO ORIGIN OF IKEBANA

 


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